Post Tagged with: "noise"

New Bonus Tracks Added to Psychetect: Extremism

New Bonus Tracks Added to Psychetect: Extremism

I’ve uploaded three new bonus tracks to the last Psychetect album Extremism:

“Recalculate”: A new recording using some of the same instruments and effects I used for “Solar Rattle.”

“Perverse Intimacy with the Sun”: A sequel to “Thirst for Annihilation” from Return to the Wasteland.

“Sleeping Demon”: A short remix of “Aqua Demonic Operating System.”

If you’ve already purchased the album you should be able to download the new tracks from Bandcamp. Let me know if you can’t.

December 30, 2013 0 comments
In Honor of World Merzbow Day: Merzbow Mantra 1

In Honor of World Merzbow Day: Merzbow Mantra 1

In honor of World Merzbow Day, here’s a short video clip that uses part of “Mantra 1″ from the Merzbuddha album. It’s a bit more gentle than most of Merzbow’s output. This album was a bit influence on my own approach to doing noise.

December 19, 2013 0 comments
The Aesthetics of Noise

The Aesthetics of Noise

Torben Sangild writes:

Apollo represents appearance, form, individuality, beauty and dream; the Apollonian aesthetics is an embellishment of suffering, a self-conscious lie, a veiling of cruelty by use of form and elegance, a semblance of beauty. Dionysus, on the other hand, represents ecstasy, being, will, intoxication and unity; the Dionysian aesthetics is a direct confrontation with the terrible foundation of being, an absurd will driving us all in our meaningless lives. In the Dionysian ecstasy individuality is transgressed6 in favor of identification with the universal will – a frightening yet blissful experience. Frightening, that is, because it is a death-like giving up of the Ego, if only for a few seconds; blissful in letting go of the responsibilities of being a subject. The Dionysian experience is a “metaphysical comfort”, knowing that suffering is a necessary part of the effects of the eternal will – the destruction of things in order to create anew. In the Dionysian ecstasy one is no longer concerned with one’s individual suffering, seeing instead things from the universal point of view.

In music, the ecstasy of noise is undoubtedly a Dionysian effect, as opposed to the Apollonian melody and form.7 As mentioned above, the German words Rausch (ecstasy) and Geräusch (noise) are related, pointing towards this fact. The Dionysian is that which is not totally controlled or formed, e.g. screams and noises. The Apollonian elements are seductive, inciting the listener to enter the ecstatic bliss of the Dionysian, enabling the listener to dare the confrontation with the dreadfulness of existence. Therefore, Nietzsche says, the Dionysian needs the Apollonian.

Merzbow is so demanding exactly because he refuses this; he does not soften the harshness of noise with any Apollonian elements. Listening to Merzbow is thus a very different experience from the Sonic Youth maelstrom.

One of the reasons for the ecstatic effect of noise is its sublime character. The sublime is that which exceeds the limits of the senses, perceived as chaos or vastness. Despite our ability to put these words to it, the sublime goes beyond making sense – we never really understand it. The complexity of noise (in the acoustic sense) overloads the ears and the nervous system and is perceived as an amorphous mass, incomprehensible yet stirring. The delight of the sublime is the satisfaction of confronting the unfathomable.

Full Story: Ubu Web: The Aesthetics of Noise

(Thanks Adam and Ryan!)

November 7, 2013 0 comments
Current 93′s David Tibet Shares His Life Story

Current 93′s David Tibet Shares His Life Story

David Tibet of Psychic TV and Current 93 shared his life story recently with Dazed & Confused magazine:

I was born in Malaysia in 1960. Paradise gained. In 1970, I left for England, where I attended an all-boys boarding school. Paradise not only lost but then packed with the sex of ghosts and kicked into the bonefire. Welcome to NeverLand.

What drove me on then: I loved CS Lewis, Tolkien, Taoist temples, the New Testament, MR James1, Christian apocalyptic, the apocryphal gospels, Aleister Crowley and Qabalah. All this before my balls dropped. I discovered the apocryphal gospels through MR James. I discovered Crowley through buying his Diary of a Drug Fiend at Kuala Lumpur airport when I was 11. The other boys at the school were frightened by my reading matter. Crowley wasn’t big with corduroy boys. My post was opened by the headmaster there; he was later sacked for playing a little too freely with his wards. Hop and skip into the Bad PicNic, made worse by the school being extensively haunted. Welcome to Old England.

After leaving university, I had a brief dalliance with the often dysfunctional family (sic) of Psychic TV2, which was briefly fun and then not. I was impelled to create a music that would channel all my obsessions. So HeyHo, Current 933.

Full Story: Dazed Digital: Your History: David Tibet

(via Ales Kot)

July 11, 2013 0 comments
The Quest to Find the First Soundscape

The Quest to Find the First Soundscape

Alexis Madrigal on his quest to find the first recordings of the urban soundscape:

Could I go back a hundred years and listen to New York or Paris?

When it comes to film, you can see all kinds of old places. Sometimes even in high resolution, thanks to the work of archivists like Rick and Megan Prelinger. These films are incredibly important records for historians and citizens alike. They give us eyes in the past.

There’s an amazing film sequence of San Francisco in 1905. A camera was placed on a streetcar and driven down Market Street, the diagonal that cuts through the city’s core. Pedestrians, cars, carts, horses, the whole dizzying array of urban life before electricity and the automobile turned our cities inside-out. We recognize our buildings, but not our city. Similar recordings exist of most major cities.

I figured that there had to be similar documentation of the metropolitan soundscape, or any soundscape really.

But there isn’t.

Full Story: The Atlantic: The Quest to Find the First Soundscape

May 25, 2013 0 comments
3 Weird Art Machines

3 Weird Art Machines

Tangible Sound Lab’s Skintimacy

The Tangible Sound Lab’s site seems to be down, so all I’ve got to go on is description of the video:

With ‘Skintimacy’ we present a skin-based interface for a collaborative musical performance. The experimental setup is intended to be both an evocative tool for interpersonal interaction and touch, as well as an alternative digital musical instrument. By integrating the human skin and touch into the musician-computer interface, we propose a bodily-close haptic and emotional experience.

(via Sara Hendren via Warren Ellis)

Destroy Angels’ Light Machine

How to Destroy Angels light show

A bit less weird, but still interesting: How to Destroy Angels’ light instrument:

Rob Sheridan, the art director for Trent Reznor’s side project How To Destroy Angels, is up on stage, but he has no instrument. More accurately, he is playing an instrument, but it doesn’t play music — it plays light.

Smeller

smeller

Those not weird enough for you? Check out Smeller:

SMELLER is a genuine organ, an olfactokinetic art device for composing, producing, interpreting, programming, recording, storing and playing back compositions made up of scents and scent chords.

The SMELLER 2.0 project encompasses
The production of the hardware
The production of the control software
The production of the notation system
The production of the scent sources (basic components)
The creation of olfactokinetic scent compositions (“Smellodies”)

(via Rahel)

April 24, 2013 0 comments
Previously Unreleased Coil Tracks

Previously Unreleased Coil Tracks

Frisk film cover

A treat for all you Coil fans:

Oh my…yes, I do believe I have a show stopper for you all. This soundtrack to Todd Verow’s film adaption of Dennis Cooper’s novel “Frisk” (IMDB info here) features original compositions by both Coil (also using their alter ego ELpH here) and Sonic Youth’s Lee Ranaldo, as well as a handful of pieces they’ve co-composed and/or have had pastiched together, medley-style. All of this loot has languished on this soundtrack up till this point without any formal release. Now, here it is for your collective predilection and as a stand-alone gesture in its own right, it works a charm.

Full Story (and download link): COIL/ELpH/LEE RANALDO-FRISK-ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK RECORDING, UNRELEASED, 1996, UK/USA

(Thanks Zir)

Also, last November a group of fans raised money online to buy the rights to a bunch of previously unreleased Nine Inch Nails remixes that Coil did for the Fixed album. You can learn more and download it here

Uncoiled album cover

February 21, 2013 1 comment
Cool Ritual Music Blog: Ritualistic Nature

Cool Ritual Music Blog: Ritualistic Nature

From the blog’s description:

The objective of this blog its to post music related with Ritual music, in traditional ethnic way or on Modern side, Ambient, Tribal, Drone, Field Recordings, Dungeon Synth etc. with a strong inspier in NATURE and is cycles.

There will be a predominance of Ritual Ambient music, a sub-genre of dark ambient.

Ritualistic Nature

February 7, 2013 1 comment
Winter Experimental Music Compilation With Cult of Zir And More

Winter Experimental Music Compilation With Cult of Zir And More

Final Solstice Comp

Vita Ignes : Corpus Lignum – Final Winter Solstice Compilation 2012 is a three disc experimental music compilation featuring tracks from Cult of Zir, Ogo Nommo (not to be confused with Ogo Eion aka An Exquisite Corpse), Paints for Anima and many more and many more.

Download it from Vita Ignes: Corpus Lignum

My interviews with Zir are here and here.

December 26, 2012 1 comment
New Psychetect Album Available Now: Extremism

New Psychetect Album Available Now: Extremism

Psychetect: Extremism cover art

My follow-up to Return to the Wasteland is finally out! This isn’t a live album, but it’s based on my live noise performances. It’s just $2 — about the cost of a cup of coffee. You can also listen to it on Soundcloud.

Cover art by Kirsten Brown. Cover design by Daniel Rafatpanah.

My previous work is all available for free from Bandcamp.

December 19, 2012 0 comments