Post Tagged with: "industrial music"

New Bonus Tracks Added to Psychetect: Extremism

New Bonus Tracks Added to Psychetect: Extremism

I’ve uploaded three new bonus tracks to the last Psychetect album Extremism:

“Recalculate”: A new recording using some of the same instruments and effects I used for “Solar Rattle.”

“Perverse Intimacy with the Sun”: A sequel to “Thirst for Annihilation” from Return to the Wasteland.

“Sleeping Demon”: A short remix of “Aqua Demonic Operating System.”

If you’ve already purchased the album you should be able to download the new tracks from Bandcamp. Let me know if you can’t.

December 30, 2013 0 comments
Previously Unreleased Coil Tracks

Previously Unreleased Coil Tracks

Frisk film cover

A treat for all you Coil fans:

Oh my…yes, I do believe I have a show stopper for you all. This soundtrack to Todd Verow’s film adaption of Dennis Cooper’s novel “Frisk” (IMDB info here) features original compositions by both Coil (also using their alter ego ELpH here) and Sonic Youth’s Lee Ranaldo, as well as a handful of pieces they’ve co-composed and/or have had pastiched together, medley-style. All of this loot has languished on this soundtrack up till this point without any formal release. Now, here it is for your collective predilection and as a stand-alone gesture in its own right, it works a charm.

Full Story (and download link): COIL/ELpH/LEE RANALDO-FRISK-ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK RECORDING, UNRELEASED, 1996, UK/USA

(Thanks Zir)

Also, last November a group of fans raised money online to buy the rights to a bunch of previously unreleased Nine Inch Nails remixes that Coil did for the Fixed album. You can learn more and download it here

Uncoiled album cover

February 21, 2013 1 comment
New Peter “Sleazy” Christopherson Track In Honor Of The 2nd Anniversary Of His Death

New Peter “Sleazy” Christopherson Track In Honor Of The 2nd Anniversary Of His Death

Boing Boing has released a preview of the forthcoming two album release by ex-Throbbing Gristle members Chris Carter, Peter ‘Sleazy’ Christopherson and Cosey Fanni Tutti (aka XTG) in honor the 2nd anniversary of Christopherson’s death. Desertshore/The Final Report will be released tomorrow on Industrial Records.

You can listen to the track on Boing Boing.

November 25, 2012 0 comments
On Misogyny in Industrial Music

On Misogyny in Industrial Music

And speaking of deflecting criticism through irony, Nadya Lev has written a long, thoughtful piece on misogyny in industrial music:

The “cinematic reference” argument seems to be a common tactic in deflecting criticism. Thomas Rainer has used the filmic term “sexploitation” to describe Nachtmahr, and Throat Full of Glass music video director, Chad Michael Ward, wrote to Coilhouse stating that “the video, conceived by both the band and myself, is a send-up of 1970s grindhouse/exploitation films, where men were thugs and women were whores; in other words caricatures, not entirely unlike the noir films of the 1930s that I also love dearly.” In reality, the “it’s an homage to grindhouse” defense is so common that it’s becoming a cliche. Here’s the thing: when Tarantino revived the grindhouse genre, it was with clever, self-aware, satirical, intelligent scripts that actually told new stories that were relevant to our time. The Bride is one of the most celebrated bad-ass film icons out there. Similarly, today’s burlesque movement revives the noir glamour of the 30s with a DIY, feminist sensibility. Contrasted to that, what collective story does the combination of these industrial music videos tell?

Full Story: On Misogyny in Industrial Music

Here’s the comment I left:

“If satire isn’t interpreted as satire, but as a sincere expression of belief, doesn’t mean that the artist has to condescend to explain it and hold the listener’s hand.”

The question of the artist’s responsibility for people not getting a piece of work is a sticky one. People completely missing the point of satire has been a thing for a long, long time. The movie Joe [1] comes to mind, but it was hardly the first.

Similarly, to what degree can an artist be criticized for utterly failing at satire? If Combachrist has been at this for as long as he has, and no one gets the joke, is that a failure as an artist on his part? (joblowcritic’s point about Laichach is particularly relevant here).

There has been a rash of movies over the past few years that claim to be satire or criticism of media violence, violence against women, etc. but simply devolve into being an embodiment of what they intended to satirize — to such a degree that it’s questionable whether the film makers ever really intended to do satire or whether that was all just a cover (Sucker Punch for example).

Combachrist and Nachtmahr have fallen into the same realm. Is this stuff *really* earnest parody, or cover for the opportunity to do whatever they want without criticism? Did it start out as parody, but at some point start feeling a bit too comfortable?

One big difference between these guys and Laibach is that, to the best of my knowledge, Laibach never used their aesthetics of fascism schtick as an excuse to, say, make a video about torturing Jews or beating women or whatever. That’s the problem I have with films like Sucker Punch, Crank and that whole family of neo-grindhouse films as well. There just isn’t a big enough difference between the real thing and the satire.

[1] http://www.inthesetimes.com/article/3013/

November 21, 2012 2 comments
Ad·ver·sary: We Demand Better

Ad·ver·sary: We Demand Better

From I Die You Die:

We were contacted a few days before leaving for Kinetik by Jairus Khan from Ad·ver·sary. He told us that he was planning a visual presentation for his set at the festival which he anticipated would attract a lot of attention, and wanted to speak to us about it. The presentation related to themes and imagery in the work of two other artists on the opening night Kinetik bill, specifically Combichrist and Nachtmahr. The presentation, which can be viewed here, or at the bottom of this post, openly critiques what Jairus perceives as the use of misogynist and racist tropes in those band’s music and publicity materials. We spoke to Jairus after seeing an early version of the video.

Full Story: Interview with Jairus Khan from Ad·ver·sary

See also:

Straight White Male: The Lowest Difficulty Setting There Is

May 19, 2012 0 comments
Coil Retrospective

Coil Retrospective

Coil

The Quietus ran a retrospective on Coil‘s career for the one year anniversary of Peter “Sleazy” Christopherson’s death:

Through a potent trinity of chemically-altered states, occult arcana and technological transmutation, Coil was, perhaps, the strangest and occasionally the most frightening of bands. While their twenty year history saw much in the way of personal turmoil and tragedies as they moved through the extreme hedonism and post-AIDS fallout of London’s gay clubland to a more hermetic but no less intoxicated existence on England’s South West coast, John Balance (née Geff Rushton) and Peter ‘Sleazy’ Christopherson remained true to their original intentions to explore, as the cover of their debut release puts it: “How sound can affect the physical and mental state of the serious listener”. Such explorations produced a unique and incomparable body of work that not only charts a most unconventional route through emergent musical technologies, but also signposts a hellishly complex set of references to occult theories and deviant figures throughout history (from Aleister Crowley to William S Burroughs) along the way. But the high physical and mental cost of their creative processes often lead to long gaps in their output. Indeed, the most elusive album in their back catalogue eluded the band themselves: Backwards, originally intended as a follow-up to 1991’s Love’s Secret Domain, was mentioned in the band’s semi-regular updates describing sessions with mainstream players such as Tim Simenon and Trent Reznor, yet the album was never released (although some of the recordings were later re-arranged posthumously for The Ape of Naples and its companion piece, The New Backwards).

The Quietus: Serious Listeners: The Strange And Frightening World Of Coil

November 28, 2011 0 comments
New Monte Cazazza album out soon, produced by Brian Lustmord

New Monte Cazazza album out soon, produced by Brian Lustmord

Monte Cazazza the Cynic

A new Monte Cazazza album, produced by Brian Lustmord, will be released soon from Blast First Petite according to Lustmord. I saw this announced on Blast First Petite’s web site, but wasn’t sure if it was a new album or a compilation or what (Lustmord’s not mentioned on the site).

Blast First Petite: Monte Cazazza

Monte Cazazza

In 1975 Monte Cazzaza coined the term “industrial music.” The very first Technoccult article (embarrassingly badly written) was on Industrial Records.

April 25, 2010 0 comments
Psychetect vs. Skerror: City of Dead Toys

Psychetect vs. Skerror: City of Dead Toys

Psychetect vs. Skerror: City of Dead Toys

<a href="http://psychetect.bandcamp.com/album/city-of-dead-toys">Unlock by Psychetect</a>

My collaboration with Skerror is out now! You can download it for free at Bandcamp.

March 30, 2010 0 comments
Ten Chapters on Tchkung

Ten Chapters on Tchkung

Adam Greenfield has posted his review of a 1994 Tchkung show. I saw them a few months ago, 8 years after this review was written, and it still holds true.

What did I want them to do with that energy? What might I have done with it myself? Alternately, what might I have done if only it was asked of me in that interval before the showbuzz wore off? Part of the problem here is that Tchkung is playing with fire, in more ways than the merely literal. The piercing, the firebreathing, the dervish-dancing, the relentless rhythms: these are all shamanic techniques for the alteration of consciousness, and there is no doubt but that they work. In their original contexts, they are all used by people undertaking specific initiatory journeys, when guided by others steeped in the traditions of their use. Of course, none of these conditions obtains at a Tchkung show. What happens when you put several hundred people into a suggestible state, in an environment filled with extraordinarily powerful signs of no fixed meaning?

v-2: Ten chapters on Tchkung

See also: Tchkung’s Post World Manifesto

May 12, 2003 1 comment
Post World Manifesto

Post World Manifesto

Industrial noise artists TCHKUNG have posted their “Post World Manifesto” online:

The Post World Movement maintains that the apocalypse has already happened and you missed it. It concerns itself not with reforming the excesses of the dominant culture, but rather with forming the culture that is to come after its last death throes. A virulent hybrid, Post World architects manipulate the scrap, garbage, and artifacts of the “real” world to create new forms of art and technology. Everywhere that you see a sculpture forged from industrial refuse, musical instruments created from car parts, baling wire and duct tape, and vehicles that run for no apparent reason. Whenever you see coyotes and raccoons dumpster diving in the heart of the urban metropolis, rogue clowns, predatory computer viruses cobbled together on makeshift systems, and squatters fabricating furniture and tapping into power lines; whenever you see these things you know the Post World Movement thrives.

Post World Industries: The Post World Manifesto

See also: 10 Chapters on Tchkung (live show review)

September 24, 2002 1 comment