Post Tagged with: "Arthur Magazine"

Cult Favorite Magazine Arthur Coming Back To Print

Cult Favorite Magazine Arthur Coming Back To Print

Alan Moore Arthur Magazine cover

How many lives does counter culture tabloid Artur Magazine have? It suspended publication in 2007, but then came back a few months later. Then it was cancelled again, becoming an online-only publication before disappearing supposedly forever. It’s coming back again, this time as $5 an issue newspaper-format publication:

After a four-year sabbatical (faked death?), your beloved revolutionary sweetheart Arthur returns to print, renewed, refreshed, reinvigorated and in a bold new format: pages as tall and wide as a daily newspaper, printed in color and black and white on compostable newsprint, with ads only on the back cover(s). Amazing!

In partnership with Portland, Oregon’s Floating World Comics, Arthur’s gang of goofs, know-it-alls and village explainers are back, from Bull Tonguers Byron Coley and Thurston Moore to radical ecologist Nance Klehm to trickster activists Center for Tactical Magic to Defend Brooklyn‘s socio-political commentator Dave Reeves to a host of new, fresh-faced troublemakers, edited by ol’ fool Jay Babcock and art directed by Yasmin Khan. You want a peek at the contents? Sorry, compadre. That would be saying too much, too soon. Wait ’til Dec. 22, 2012: that’s right—THE DAY AFTER THE NON-END OF THE WORLD!

Please keep in mind… Arthur is no longer distributed for free anywhere. Those days are (sadly) long gone. Now you gotta buy Arthur or you won’t see it. Our price: Five bucks cheeeeeep!

You can pre-order the new issue here.

November 15, 2012 0 comments
Peter Lamborn Wilson’s obituary for Robert Anton Wilson

Peter Lamborn Wilson’s obituary for Robert Anton Wilson

For all we knew, Robert Anton Wilson and I were related. On an intuitive basis-i.e., after several rounds of Jameson’s and Guinness-we decided we were cousins. Subsequently we came to believe ourselves connected to the Wilsons who play so murky a role in the ‘Montauk Mysteries’ (Aleister Crowley, UFOs and Nazis in Long Island, time travel experiments gone awry, etc.). Our plan to co-edit a family anthology (including Colin, S. Clay, and Anthony Burgess, whose real name was Wilson) never materialized-although we did collaborate in editing Semiotext(e) SF, together with Rudy Rucker.

There’s no doubt Bob was some sort of anarchist. His earliest interests and experiences (the School of Living, for example) involved connections with old-time American Philosophical or Individualist Anarchism of the Spooner/Tucker variety, and, in fact, this shared background firmed the basis of our friendship.

Arthur Magazine: Peter Lamborn Wilson’s obituary for Robert Anton Wilson

December 6, 2007 0 comments
New Arthur Magazine is now available

New Arthur Magazine is now available

arthur magazine

This one kinda snuck up on me. Anyway, you can probably find a copy at a hipster record store near you, or download it:

Part 1.

Part 2.

Part 3.

As usual it has stuff from the Center for Tactical Magic, Erik Davis, and Douglas Rushkoff.

December 6, 2007 0 comments
Archive of 70s counter culture fashion magazine Rags

Archive of 70s counter culture fashion magazine Rags

rags magazine

Rags was a counterculture fashion magazine ahead of its time. Published monthly in San Francisco from June 1970 through June 1971, its focus was street fashion rather than the fashion found in store windows.

Rags Lives!

(via Arthur Magazine blog).

October 11, 2007 0 comments
Douglas Rushkoff on 9/11 Truth

Douglas Rushkoff on 9/11 Truth

By looking under the rug for what isn’t even there, we neglect the horror show that is in plain view. In the process, we make it even easier for the criminals running our government to perpetuate their illegal, unethical and un-American activities.

In fact, the most logical conclusion I can draw from the existing evidence is that 9-11 theorists are themselves covert government operatives, dedicated to confusing the public, distracting activists from their tasks, equating all dissent with the lunatic fringe, and provoking the counterculture’s misplaced belief in the competency of its foes.
That’s the real conspiracy.

Full Story: Arthur Magazine.

September 21, 2007 5 comments
New Arthur Magazine available for download

New Arthur Magazine available for download

Arthur Magazine is back from the dead, and you can download the new issue below. It’s already out in LA and will be available nationally on the 5th of September. The new issue features new stuff from the Center for Tactical Magic, Douglas Rushkoff on 9/11 Truth, and more:

Part 1.

Part 2.

September 3, 2007 0 comments
Alan Moore interview on art and the occult in Arthur Magazine

Alan Moore interview on art and the occult in Arthur Magazine

Arthur: Of course the other aspect of magic that separates it from most religions is that it’s not based on faith, is it?

Oh, no. No. Faith is for sissies who daren’t go and look for themselves. That’s my basic position. Magic is based upon gnosis. Direct knowledge. It’s a kind of ‘I’m from Missouri. Show me’ approach, if you like. [laughter] I think that gnosis it’s probably the original form of spirituality in mankind. If you look back at the old Gnostic religions that proceeded Christianity, what they depended on was direct knowledge of the Mysteries, or the ideas being talked about. If you look at the early Christians, the people that were allegedly around Jesus, then you can’t get much gnostic than St. Thomas. [chuckles] He has to stick his hand in the wound before he was convinced! Or you’ve got the Essenes, with John the Baptist-they were certainly gnostics. Back then, everybody formed their own relationship to the godhead, which was seen as being inside them, as much as anything.

This is true of the old shamanic religions, that were the forebears of all kind of spiritual and religious thinking. The shaman didn’t so much act as a middleman between people and the gods; he showed them how to get there. He told them how to make their own journeys into the Underworld. I get the impression that the shaman in an ancient tribe would have had the same sort of position as a plumber or an electrician. [chuckles] A plumber is a guy who just knows about plumbing and doesn’t mind getting his hands dirty when he’s unblocking your S-bend or whatever. A shaman is a guy who knows about traveling to the spirit world and doesn’t mind vomiting because he’s taking poisonous drugs, or getting the horrors of going to hell. It’s a community thing.

The later idea of magic, which probably sprung up when people started burning witches and magicians, when it became dangerous to be a magician. Which would probably have been around the ooo, what, the 3rd century, 4th century? When Christian mobs started putting Gnostics in hermetic scholars to death, Around that time there were Christian mobs that were putting to death hermetic scholars like Hypatea. We mention her in the first issue of Promethea. She was real. She was, I think, skinned alive by Christians. And so at that point, this is where you start to get the thing of secrecy and magic, which carries on from that point up to the present day. ‘If you’re a magician, don’t tell anybody. Don’t tell them and don’t tell them any of the visions you’ve had or give them any of the information that you struggled so long to accrue. Keep it to yourself.’ And that seems very elitist to me. I’d rather disseminate any information I’m getting by one of the means that are open to me. And I’m lucky in that I have several quite excellent means [chuckles] to disseminate information that are open to me. Comic books, CDs, things like that.

Full Story: Arthur.

May 14, 2007 1 comment
Arthur Magazine not dead yet!

Arthur Magazine not dead yet!

This particular Arthur saga has a few chapters left in it.

Despite being declared dead by co-founder and editor Jay Babcock back in February, the much-mourned Arthur magazine announced its return earlier this month to the already too-small world of long-form counterculture journalism. Babcock’s negotiations with publisher Laris Kreslins to buy out Kreslins’ half of the mag had reached a seemingly hopeless impasse, but a recent breakthrough finally pushed the deal through.

“The main thing is that he came back to the table and we reached a deal, and I got loans from friends and family which allowed me to buy him out,” says Babcock, who has run the magazine from his home in Atwater Village since its inception in 2002. “I have now gained 100 percent control of Arthur, and I intend to resume publishing the magazine as soon as all the financing is in order.”

Full story: LA CityBeat.

May 8, 2007 0 comments
On Grant Morrison and his religious devotion to “the system”

On Grant Morrison and his religious devotion to “the system”

These comments from the Grant Morrison in Arthur Magazine thread but I thought it would be worth highlighting them on the front page.

The first comment comes from Trevor Blake:

Role models for Aryan supermen, cartoon ethics, trusting in Bush / Blair /Nixon, negating the drive toward individuality, the holocaust was perfectly valid… y’all remember this next time you hear someone say ?I don’t like [x], he’s a fascist.’

Morrison found flaws in his previous sense of what the purpose of his life and life in general was. He ditched the flawed understanding. Excellent.
He replaced it with a bigger ?purpose’ in which everyone is as groovy as everyone else. Bunk.

Here’s the scoop: he, me, everyone, and everything has no ?purpose.’ Some humans can give themselves a purpose that is satisfying. That’s about it.

My response:

Here’s another choice Morrison quote:

‘Asked about the current state of the world, particularly the war in Iraq, Mr. Morrison offered, ?perhaps it’s just an essential part of the system, as horrible as that may seem.’ He wasn’t particularly interested in being part of any active anti-war movement, and noted that in his previous experience, a number of those people only seemed to be ?interested in meeting up with the police.”

I’d like to think that it goes with out saying that I don’t endorse Morrison’s philosophy on this, but since people very frequently confuse my opinions with the opinions of people I quote here, I figure I’ll set the record straight: I think Morrison’s whole ‘it’s all part of the system’s plan’ philosophy is a bunch of crap. I’m also not fond of his ‘individuality is an illusion’ stuff.

I don’t disagree with what I’ve read about Manuel DeLanda’s position on individuals and societies, but I haven’t read his new book yet. Shaviro’s review is here. He seems to reach a logical conclusion distinct from the over-romanticizing of of the individual and the problematic concepts of new age collectivism.

I look forward to reading Bloom’s Lucifer Principle as well.

‘Here’s the scoop: he, me, everyone, and everything has no ?purpose.’ Some humans can give themselves a purpose that is satisfying. That’s about it.’

Agreed, more or less. Nothing has any meaning save for what we impose on it. This is not bad/depressing, but liberating.

Bush and his cronies did not have to invade Iraq to fulfill some systemic destiny. They made a choice. We have a choice as well – accept the decisions made by the control machines, or struggle to change things.

March 2, 2007 14 comments
Now classic Grant Morrison interview in Arthur Magazine

Now classic Grant Morrison interview in Arthur Magazine

grant morrison arthur magazine cover

Arthur Magazine has posted their now classic interview with Grant Morrison on their web site:

And The Filth came out of that, trying to understand that every cherished thought and belief had an equally valid counterpoint. Once I realized I had to think about this stuff and I had to deal with it, I decided to treat it as an Abyss experience, based on the ideas of kabbalistic magic. Because that at least gave me a context to deal with the experience. According to Kabbalah, or to Enochian magic, the Abyss is a kind of Ring-Pass-Not for consciousness, which means that beyond that, the typical self-aware 11-bit consciousness you use to get through the day, doesn’t operate. The kabbalistic idea of the Abyss is manifold. There’s a kind of crack in Being and the crack is the moment of the Breath before the Big Bang. It’s also the crack of dead time where we do nothing when we’d like to do something, the crack between the thought of doing and actually doing. That gulf can become immense and daunting. We might decide to be President and do nothing, leading to a life of reproach and regret. [chuckle] Then you’re in the Abyss. So I felt this confrontation with difficult material coming, and I chose to frame it as a trip into the Abyss, I took the Oath of the Abyss, from the Thelemic version of Kabbalah, the Aleister Crowley version, and…again all this stuff really is to me ways of contextualizing states of consciousness. Crowley also talks about the demon Choronzon who’s the guardian of the Abyss, and Choronzon is a demon who takes any thought and amplifies until it becomes a completely disorienting storm of disconnected gibberish.

Full Story: Arthur Magazine.

February 23, 2007 3 comments