Many look to the Bible for financial advice, but is it wise?

Depending on your view, the Bible is divinely inspired or a collection of tall tales. But many see it as a source of financial wisdom that transcends individual faith and the centuries between when it was written and today’s tough times. [...]

Purveyors of biblically based financial advice count up to 2,300 verses on money management. Frequently cited verses in the Book of Proverbs urge careful spending, including “The plans of the diligent lead to profit, as surely as haste leads to poverty.” Another warns debtors that “the borrower is servant to the lender.”

Blue sees advice to diversify stock portfolios in a verse about a man’s “bread” from Ecclesiastes: “Give portions to seven, yes to eight, for you do not know what disaster may come upon the land.”

But the many verses can be interpreted in different ways.

For instance, in the Gospel of John, Jesus says, “I have come that they might have life, and have it to the full,” which some “prosperity gospel” preachers see as a promise of material wealth to faithful givers. Others say it’s an assurance of joy or contentment.

USA Today: Many look to the Bible for financial advice, but is it wise?

(via Religion News)

See also: Prosperity gospel’s role in crashing the economy

1 Comment

  1. Article makes no mention of usury, on which the Bible is very clear: “Thou shalt not lend upon usury to thy brother; usury of money, usury of victuals, usury of any thing that is lent upon usury: Unto a stranger thou mayest lend upon usury; but unto thy brother thou shalt not lend upon usury: that the LORD thy God may bless thee in all that thou settest thine hand to in the land whither thou goest to possess it.” Deuteronomy 23:19-20

    Usury means a loan with interest. The Bible says believers should only do that to non-believers, and never (never) to each other. Christianity is 100% incompatible with banking.

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