‘Bacterial Computers': Genetically Engineered Bacteria Have Potential To Solve Complicated Mathematical Problems

US researchers have created ‘bacterial computers’ with the potential to solve complicated mathematics problems. The findings of the research demonstrate that computing in living cells is feasible, opening the door to a number of applications. The second-generation bacterial computers illustrate the feasibility of extending the approach to other computationally challenging math problems. [...]

The Hamiltonian Path Problem asks whether there is a route in a network from a beginning node to an ending node, visiting each node exactly once. The student and faculty researchers modified the genetic circuitry of the bacteria to enable them to find a Hamiltonian path in a three-node graph. Bacteria that successfully solved the problem reported their success by fluorescing both red and green, resulting in yellow colonies.

Science Daily: ‘Bacterial Computers': Genetically Engineered Bacteria Have Potential To Solve Complicated Mathematical Problems

(via OVO)

2 Comments

  1. more news on bacteria: rapid biotech factories
    http://www.physorg.com/news167833209.html

  2. Here is a follow up to this article:

    World’s Smallest Computers Made of DNA and Other Biological Molecules Made to ‘Think’ Logically

    Biomolecular computers, made of DNA and other biological molecules, only exist today in a few specialized labs, remote from the regular computer user. Nonetheless, Tom Ran and Shai Kaplan, research students in the lab of Prof. Ehud Shapiro of the Weizmann Institute’s Biological Chemistry, and Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Departments have found a way to make these microscopic computing devices ‘user friendly,’ even while performing complex computations and answering complicated queries.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090803092606.htm

    and if thats not enough even more biohacking:

    New Microbe Strain Makes More Electricity, Faster

    Microbial fuel cells, which convert fuel to electricity without combustion, consist of an electrode known as an anode that accepts electrons from the microorganisms, and another electrode known as a cathode, which transfers electrons onto oxygen. Electrons flow between the anode and the cathode to provide the current that can be harvested to power electronic devices.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090729210821.htm

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